HGDR2b

HGDR2b

adverve:

Logorama is not a medical condition.

Directed by the French animation collective H5, François Alaux, Hervé de Crécy + Ludovic Houplain, it is however an awesome little piece of logo madness. IS IT SOCIAL COMMENTARY ON THE VISUAL POLLUTION BRANDS FOIST ON THE CITIZENRY? Perhaps reader, perhaps. We just call it fun. (Via.)

fuckyeahtattoos:

This is the first session of my chest piece. It took eight hours of my two tattoo artists working at the same time, with very few five minute breaks. The roses were done by Jay Joree and the background & script were done by Gerald Garcia, both at Last Angels Tattoo in Dallas, Texas.

fuckyeahtattoos:

This is the first session of my chest piece. It took eight hours of my two tattoo artists working at the same time, with very few five minute breaks. The roses were done by Jay Joree and the background & script were done by Gerald Garcia, both at Last Angels Tattoo in Dallas, Texas.

dresdencodak:

shoomlah:

oxboxer:

greatsc0tt:

oxboxer:

arcsin:
Signal boost. Artists, learn what your work is worth. Commissioners, learn what you’re asking for. If someone’s serious about being a professional illustrator, they should look into the Graphic Artists’ Guild guidelines before they even touch Loomis or Gurney.

I’m curious who would pay so much for artwork though.  Par example, there’s a small art gallery in Columbia, South Carolina selling 5x7 cards covered in Sharpie squiggles.  The cards are going for over $100.  I understand the time and effort that goes into art, but I don’t know people who can afford to spend so much for it.Though I don’t understand why two bucks is too much for fully rendered little A5 format chibis. 

In the case of that gallery, those are probably priced that way standard gallery cut of each sale is 50% (or higher). The artist is only getting $50. Which… I actually hope the artist has a lot of them Sharpie squiggles for sale and also has a day job, because $50 ain’t gonna cover their rent and groceries.
Work destined for publishing is also priced far higher not because “more work went into it” or “the anatomy is more quality” (or whatever other bullshit quality metric), but because the client isn’t ONLY buying the artwork. They are also buying the legal rights to exclusively use a piece in a specific market for a limited amount of time without getting their ass sued. Factor in that most commercial illustrators are freelancers and need to cover a lot of costs to keep the lights on (and thus continue delivering what the client wants), and the price skyrockets from “fandom commission token respect prices” to something that might actually constitute a living wage as outlined in the GAG13.

Reblogging for the commentary.  Yes, so-called “fandom” artists are notoriously bad at pricing themselves, but it’s unfair to compare them to book illustrators and their respective price points.  Fine art/gallery pricing is far more applicable- there’s a big difference when you work is being published or licensed.
tl;dr, you should probably be charging more.  I’ve rarely, if ever, run into an artist online who is overcharging for their work.
-C

Remember, too, that when you’re paying an artist for work, you’re not just paying for X hours spent on the picture, you’re paying for the thousand upon thousands of hours of practice, training and education that went into producing a skilled person capable of giving you this art.  You’re paying for the privilege of having something uniquely produced, something that you can’t get anywhere else in the world.  
Too many artists undercharge for their work, which not only harms them but the rest of us, because it warps the expectations of the community and industries when they come looking for work from us.  
So when you’re asked “Why should I pay you X when these other guys are charging less?”  The best response is “Because I produce quality work and I know what that’s worth in the long term.”
-AD

dresdencodak:

shoomlah:

oxboxer:

greatsc0tt:

oxboxer:

arcsin:

Signal boost. Artists, learn what your work is worth. Commissioners, learn what you’re asking for. If someone’s serious about being a professional illustrator, they should look into the Graphic Artists’ Guild guidelines before they even touch Loomis or Gurney.

I’m curious who would pay so much for artwork though.  Par example, there’s a small art gallery in Columbia, South Carolina selling 5x7 cards covered in Sharpie squiggles.  The cards are going for over $100.  I understand the time and effort that goes into art, but I don’t know people who can afford to spend so much for it.

Though I don’t understand why two bucks is too much for fully rendered little A5 format chibis. 

In the case of that gallery, those are probably priced that way standard gallery cut of each sale is 50% (or higher). The artist is only getting $50. Which… I actually hope the artist has a lot of them Sharpie squiggles for sale and also has a day job, because $50 ain’t gonna cover their rent and groceries.

Work destined for publishing is also priced far higher not because “more work went into it” or “the anatomy is more quality” (or whatever other bullshit quality metric), but because the client isn’t ONLY buying the artwork. They are also buying the legal rights to exclusively use a piece in a specific market for a limited amount of time without getting their ass sued. Factor in that most commercial illustrators are freelancers and need to cover a lot of costs to keep the lights on (and thus continue delivering what the client wants), and the price skyrockets from “fandom commission token respect prices” to something that might actually constitute a living wage as outlined in the GAG13.

Reblogging for the commentary.  Yes, so-called “fandom” artists are notoriously bad at pricing themselves, but it’s unfair to compare them to book illustrators and their respective price points.  Fine art/gallery pricing is far more applicable- there’s a big difference when you work is being published or licensed.

tl;dr, you should probably be charging more.  I’ve rarely, if ever, run into an artist online who is overcharging for their work.

-C

Remember, too, that when you’re paying an artist for work, you’re not just paying for X hours spent on the picture, you’re paying for the thousand upon thousands of hours of practice, training and education that went into producing a skilled person capable of giving you this art.  You’re paying for the privilege of having something uniquely produced, something that you can’t get anywhere else in the world.  

Too many artists undercharge for their work, which not only harms them but the rest of us, because it warps the expectations of the community and industries when they come looking for work from us.  

So when you’re asked “Why should I pay you X when these other guys are charging less?”  The best response is “Because I produce quality work and I know what that’s worth in the long term.”

-AD

(Source: bambicandi)

skatesonaplane:

There are three things you can count on when the Islanders visit Toronto. 1.    There will be more media in the locker room than players.2.    John Tavares and Matt Moulson will need at least two pages for their postgame guest list3.    Every player will leave town with an NHLPA shopping bag, filled to the brim with free swagJust a block away from the Maple Leaf’s Air Canada Center, the NHLPA office welcomes all card-carrying members into their famous swag room, where players have free reign over everything from hats, sweaters, golf shirts and workout gear to video games, NHL action figures and any other merchandise that includes their likenesses.As each player boarded the bus to the game this afternoon, bag in hand, one player’s haul garnered more attention than the rest. Peaking out of the top of Matt Martin’s bag was a coveted item that no other Islander had seen during the shopping frenzy: A John Tavares action figure.Martin’s selection, as well as the rest of the team’s disappointment that they hadn’t seen it first, fit into the players’ ongoing tendency of being obsessed with each other’s merchandise. Whether it’s Matt Moulson’s Mouls-Stache shirt, Michael Grabner’s 2011 All-Star jersey-tee and Gremlin shirt, or John Tavares’ JT91 gear, the team can’t seem to get enough.    I didn’t fill a bag for myself at the NHLPA store, but I did drop by the PRPA office to load up on cheap hotel pens, phone chargers and blank ticket envelopes. No Kimber Auerbach action figures in site, but there’s always next time.

skatesonaplane:

There are three things you can count on when the Islanders visit Toronto.

1.    There will be more media in the locker room than players.
2.    John Tavares and Matt Moulson will need at least two pages for their postgame guest list
3.    Every player will leave town with an NHLPA shopping bag, filled to the brim with free swag

Just a block away from the Maple Leaf’s Air Canada Center, the NHLPA office welcomes all card-carrying members into their famous swag room, where players have free reign over everything from hats, sweaters, golf shirts and workout gear to video games, NHL action figures and any other merchandise that includes their likenesses.

As each player boarded the bus to the game this afternoon, bag in hand, one player’s haul garnered more attention than the rest. Peaking out of the top of Matt Martin’s bag was a coveted item that no other Islander had seen during the shopping frenzy: A John Tavares action figure.

Martin’s selection, as well as the rest of the team’s disappointment that they hadn’t seen it first, fit into the players’ ongoing tendency of being obsessed with each other’s merchandise. Whether it’s Matt Moulson’s Mouls-Stache shirt, Michael Grabner’s 2011 All-Star jersey-tee and Gremlin shirt, or John Tavares’ JT91 gear, the team can’t seem to get enough.    

I didn’t fill a bag for myself at the NHLPA store, but I did drop by the PRPA office to load up on cheap hotel pens, phone chargers and blank ticket envelopes. No Kimber Auerbach action figures in site, but there’s always next time.